Volume 4, Issue 2-1, April 2016, Page: 25-28
Teaching Scientific and Professional Ethics: A Model of Graduate Student Training from Psychology
Rose A. Sevcik, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Julia Perilla, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Received: Nov. 1, 2015;       Accepted: Feb. 2, 2016;       Published: May 13, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.hss.s.2016040201.14      View  3667      Downloads  131
Abstract
As individuals engage in research and/or clinical practice, reference to, and guidance from, their professional codes of ethics permeates their work. There has been a rise in the number of web sites, workshops, and publications about ethical training and behavior. Increasingly, courses have been developed for students at the graduate level along with up to date content provided in the form of continuing education activity for professionals in practice. Contemporary approaches to ethics training have moved away from rule-governed practices to developing ethical decision frameworks. In addition, recognizing the character of the professional has become essential. Acknowledging the influences on developing students’ professional identities is fundamental to their graduate training. The purpose of this article is to illustrate one such approach to graduate training in ethics.
Keywords
Ethical Decision Making, Doctoral Education, Ethics Training
To cite this article
Rose A. Sevcik, Julia Perilla, Teaching Scientific and Professional Ethics: A Model of Graduate Student Training from Psychology, Humanities and Social Sciences. Special Issue: Ethical Sensitivity: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Vol. 4, No. 2-1, 2016, pp. 25-28. doi: 10.11648/j.hss.s.2016040201.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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